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Glendon Map

The conference is taking place in the Manor or Glendon Hall, which is #16 on this map (with the circular driveway)

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Travel within Toronto: The easiest way to get to Glendon College is by taking the 124 bus from Lawrence station (Yonge subway line) to Bayview Avenue. Participants staying in the Best Western Roehampton or elsewhere near the college can take the 34 bus along Eglinton to Bayview and then the 11 up Bayview to Lawrence.

Glendon College directions: http://www.glendon.yorku.ca/english/directions/direction.html

Travel Funding

The organizers of Active History: History for the Future are pleased to announce that we have received funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. Part of this funding is being allocated to help fund travel and accommodation for historians who do not have access to institutional travel funding. Preference will be given to independent historians. Forms must be submitted by August 31st in order to receive consideration. For more information please contact tpeace@yorku.ca.

Travel Support form:active-history-travel-funding-form

Travel and Accommodation Information

Rail and bus: Participants travelling by train or bus will arrive at either Union Station (train) or the Toronto bus depot. Both of these stations are located downtown. To get to Glendon College from downtown, take the Yonge Street subway up to Lawrence Station and bus 124 to Bayview Avenue.

Air to Toronto: Participants travelling by air have a few options to choose. If travelling from Ottawa, Montreal, Halifax, Quebec City, or New York City you can take Porter Airlines (www.flyporter.com). This small full-service airline flies into Toronto City Centre Airport and is generally cheaper than most of the larger Canadian airlines. Porter offers a complimentary shuttle to Union Station where you can catch the subway up to the conference or your hotel. All other airlines fly into Pearson International Airport. This airport is located in Mississauga in the west end of the city. The TTC offers an express bus service (route 192) from the airport to Kipling subway station ($2.75) and GO Transit offers service to Yorkdale and York Mills Stations ($4.20). Both buses pick up passengers near column Q2 in terminal one. For more information visit their websites at www.ttc.ca and www.gotransit.ca.

Air to Buffalo: Participants from the United States may find cheaper flights by flying in and out of Buffalo International Airport. There is a shuttle run by Coach USA/Coach Canada between the airport and downtown Toronto. The price is fairly reasonable. The website is: http://www.megabus.com/us/

Travel within Toronto: The easiest way to get to Glendon College is by taking the 124 bus from Lawrence station (Yonge subway line) to Bayview Avenue. Participants staying in the Best Western Roehampton or elsewhere near the college can take the 34 bus along Eglinton to Bayview and then the 11 up Bayview to Lawrence.

Glendon College directions: http://www.glendon.yorku.ca/english/directions/direction.html

Accommodation: We have blocked off 5 smoking and 5 non-smoking rooms at the Best Western Roehampton Hotel & Suites. The rooms cost $125/night and can be booked by calling the hotel at 1-800-387-8899. The rooms will be held by the hotel until August 26. When booking make sure that you tell the attendant that you are with the Active History conference at Glendon College. Thomas Peace (tpeace@yorku.ca) can provide more specific information about these bookings. Graduate students who would like a more affordable option (like a pull-out couch) can contact Thomas Peace (tpeace@yorku.ca) for more information.

Program

I have now posted the program for Active History: History for the Future.  I would also like to take this opportunity to encourage people to register for the conference, as we have limited space at Glendon and we will need to cap registration at 100 people.

We will be accepting proposals until the 10th of April.

 

Margaret Conrad’s 2007 CHA Presidential address seems like a good place to begin a discussion on what is Active History. Feel free to leave your comments.

“In a context in which history is increasingly commodity and spectacle, it becomes necessary for academic historians to generate a dialogue with the public about the uses and abuses of the past. This is not always a pleasant conversation, but it is one of the obligations of scholars in a democratic society who have the privilege of dealing in the coin of knowledge and ideas. As former CHA president Jean-Claude Robert argued persuasively in 2003, it is incumbent upon us as university professors also to be public intellectuals.(ft.37) We have been too long focused on honing our professionalism and too little involved in the wider world where many people have a curiosity about the past and a passion for historical research equivalent to our own. What is unworthy, for example, about being a genealogist, an amateur historian, or what academics sneeringly call an “antiquarian”? Surely, we all work in the same corner of the knowledge vineyard and have a lot to learn from each other. American historian Carl Becker made this point in his much-cited article, “Everyman His Own Historian,” published in 1932,(ft.38) in which he reversed the charge of relevance. Academic historians, he argued, needed to adapt their knowledge to the necessities of the present rather than “cultivate a species of dry professional arrogance growing out of the thin soil of antiquarian research.” Touché.” (Margaret Conrad, Public History and its Discontents or History in the Age of Wikipedia, 11-12)

For the full-text see: http://cha-shc.ca/english/info/Conrad_CHA_Address.pdf